Alina Szapocznikow: Human Landscapes at The Hepworth Wakefield

By Tascha von Uexkull   Dismembered, dislocated bodies, almost abstracted in their detachment from their source. A solitary arm lies lifeless upon the plinth in the foreground of my vision. Behind it, human forms snatched of their perfect refinement lack unity and selfhood. A chaos of jumbled half-bodies, like ancient Classical sculptures in their brokenness.…

The Title That Focuses Our Eyes ‘On Beauty’

By Rebecca Gill When we encounter a piece of creative work, be it in a visual or literary form, we are also given a title alongside it. Whether the title comes as a secondary encounter, perhaps seeing the small gallery plaque on the wall after enjoying gazing at a painting; or an inescapably preliminary piece…

On Beauty’s Sincerity

by Rosie Matthews   The aesthetics of postmodernism and poststructuralism have, to some degree, tainted our current reception of ‘sincerity’. Such movements, at their core, subverted any easy understanding and reception of ‘genuine’ experience of art. What has prevailed is an ethos of irony and skepticism in which we have arguably come to perceive all meaning in art, and all artistic intent, as inauthentic. In such a view, the possibility of an aesthetic that ascribes to the authentic human experience, seems impossible. There are a number of contemporary writers and artists that are, however, seeking to rehabilitate sincerity. This emerging…

Sweet Desires: Kara Walker, Sugar and Space

by Esther Vincent   In 2014 a monumental sugar sculpture, created by prolific American artist Kara Walker, was unveiled in Brooklyn’s abandoned Domino Sugar Refinery. The artist utilised architectural space, text, and the weighty historical significance of the material itself, to convey a critical understanding of our contemporary relationship to slavery and the foundations of…

I the Poet. You the Poet. An Interview with the Artists.

By Alice Gillie In August 2017, I visited ‘ I the Poet. You the Poet’, a new and exciting exhibition created by artists and sisters  Laurie and Biba Cole at SPACE in Old Market, Bristol. The exhibition aimed to examine the often unexplored interaction between poetry and visual art; how each medium draws from, influences…

Two Forms of Clouds

By Mau Baiocco Gordon Baldwin, Cloud 2 Are there any subjects in art which demand the artist to capture motion? We could quickly enumerate the following: rivers, seas, winds—and clouds. Among these it is the last which seems to me the least studied; perhaps no convention has developed for these objects which, alone among those populating the landscape, don’t seem to be subject to form. Artists recur to any variety of means and approaches to depict them: from wispy lines to thick brushstrokes, from formations which envelop themselves in shadows to depthless entities. They are accessories to narrative too: God…

Not Safe For Capitalism: Jenny Hval and the ritual of sex and embodiment

by Amanda Borg The polyphonic work of the Norwegian avant-garde artist Jenny Hval creates a seemingly contradictory artistic body of material combining the transgressive and pop-cultural elements found throughout her textual, visual, performative and musical projects. Reviews of her most recent studio album, Blood Bitch (2016), places it within a lineage of abject art that…

Challenging Beauty: Plato’s Symposium

The physical side of beauty becomes more and more important, while the concept of “interior beauty” goes the opposite direction. How can we reverse this trend? The answer might be found in Plato’s philosophy.

Artless Art and the Redundant Artist

by Emilia Wrelton When we think of art we think of images, of colours, of people, of objects. We think of stories, of understanding, of meaning and of intention. We think of experiencing the art in relation to the visual cues, so what happens when the visual cues are removed? For centuries artists have created…